THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
online edition | www.uca.edu.ar/damqatum
CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS DE HISTORIA
DEL ANTIGUO ORIENTE
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
FACULTY OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF ARGENTINA
DAMQĀTUM
online edition | www.uca.edu.ar/cehao
ISSN 1852-6594
N. 8 | 2012


p. 03. Ancient Anatolia and Beyond. An Interview with
Stefano de Martino / Romina Della Casa
INDEX p. 05. The Chalcolithic in Palestine. A Research Project from
N. 8 | 2012
Argentina / Pablo F. Jaruf
p. 06. Solar Funerary Boat from the First Dynasty / Carolina
Quintana
p. 07. In memoriam: Itamar Singer
p. 09. Queen of Sheba Genetics / María de los Ángeles
Picone
p. 10. The So-Called Osiris Bed in Ancient Egypt / Amgad
Elwakeel
p. 15. In the Light of Amarna: 100 Years of the Nefertiti
Discovery
p. 17. CEHAO Scholarly Participation 2011-2012
CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS DE HISTORIA
DEL ANTIGUO ORIENTE
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
FACULTY OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL AND COMMUNICATION SCIENCES
PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF ARGENTINA
Damqātum is published by the Centro de Estudios de Historia del Antiguo Oriente
(CEHAO). The CEHAO was founded in 2002 and is a non-profit, academic,
scientific organization. Director: Juan Manuel Tebes. Secretary: Romina Della
Casa.
Damqātum was founded by Juan Manuel Tebes. Editors: Francisco Céntola and
Virginia Laporta. Col aborators 2012: Jorge Cano Moreno - Romina Del a Casa -
Amgad Elwakeel - Graciela Gestoso Singer - Pablo Jaruf - Diana Liensang - María
de los Ángeles Picone - Carolina Quintana - Veronica Tamorri.
Address: Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500 P.B. C1107AFD. Buenos Aires,
Argentina. Tel: (54-11) 4349-0200 ext. 1189.
The opinions expressed in this volume are those of the authors, and do not
necessarily reflect the views of Damqātum.
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
2

» Interview
An Interview with Stefano de Martino
ANCIENT ANATOLIA
AND BEYOND
Romina Della Casa Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina / IMHICIHU-CONICET
|
rof. Stefano de Martino teaches Hittitology and History of
P
kingdom was just a part of the world, and each part of the world
the Ancient Near East at the University of Torino. He is
had connections with the other. Consequently, I think it is
Director of the PhD School of Humanities of the University of
important to have a general knowledge of ancient Near Eastern
Torino and of the Centro Ricerche Archeologiche e Scavi di
studies, either from attending specialized classes or from
Torino per il Medio Oriente e l’Asia. His research is focused on
attending conferences, or even from reading the most
the Syro-Anatolian region, and comprises many historical and
important literature on the subject. Using these tools, you can
philological topics. In this interview he talks about his
have an open view of the entire pre-Classical world.
experience within this particular field.
Do you think contemporary Hittitologists usually have this open
How were your first steps in Hittitology?
view?
I started to study at the University of Florence, and my idea
Well, some Hittitologists come from linguistics and
was to study Greek history. So for the first two years my classes
consequently they are particularly interested in the Hittite
were in Classical history, and then I took the classes in ancient
language; but they also work on other Indo-European
Near Eastern history. My teacher was Fiorella Imparati, and I
languages and we can say that, under the linguistic point of
liked it very much, so I wrote my dissertation on music and
view, they are used to doing comparative analyses. Meanwhile,
dance in Hittite society. I decided that if I could, I would like to
we can see that other scholars are more involved in historical,
continue with these studies. After that, I have to say, I was lucky.
philological or archaeological issues. In fact, there are too many
I had the opportunity of being in Mainz, as assistant of Professor
different levels and it all depends on what opportunities you
Heinrich Otten for two years, and so I learned a lot about
have. If you study at a German university you can do both
philology, the Hittite language, as wel as the way of working on
Assyriology and Hittitology at the same time. However, in Italy it
the tablets.
is not always possible because at some universities there is
Hittitology but not Assyriology, or the contrary. In my opinion it is
With your experience, what advice would you give to young
important that young scholars spend some years - I would say
people who want to work in the field of Hittitology?
at least a couple of years - abroad. If the place from where they
are coming does not give the opportunity to study something
I think that the first step is always to be able to work on the
so specific as Hittitology, travel ing abroad and being in contact
cuneiform script and the language. There are different levels:
with scholars that are experts in the field will help them to get
you can be a very good philologist, or you can be more
some experience regarding the specificities of the discipline.
interested in history, anthropology, archaeology and literature. If
this is the case, you will use the secondary literature more often;
Which places are the best for studying Hittitology in your
however, you also need to check the original texts. Moreover, it
opinion?
is also necessary not to limit oneself to the exclusive study of
Hittitology; but one should also study Assyriology and
German universities (e.g. Berlin, Munich or Würzburg) are, in
Egyptology in order to have an overview of the ancient
my opinion, the best all over the world, alongside North
Mediterranean. This is very important because the Hittite
American universities. Chicago, for example, is a wonderful
3
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DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER

place. At the moment in London there is unfortunately only a
When I started my studies, there was not even an updated
part-time position in Hittitology after the retirement of Professor
dictionary: the only existing work was the one by Johannes
David Hawkins. Hittitology in France is also in a complicated
Friedrich, which was very old. So we worked in a very
situation, so I would say that either Germany or the United
experimental way and we had to check the cuneiform texts.
States would be the best options.
For example, when I was studying Hittite music, it was not
…and here in Italy?
even clear which verbs meant ‘play’, or ‘to play string
instruments’ or ‘to play percussion instruments’. I even
In Italy the best centers for Near Eastern studies were Napoli
d
remember that the word GIŠ. INANNA was translated as ‘lyre’
and Rome. However, the economic situation limits our
or ‘drum’, which of course are very different instruments.
resources. For example, after Alfonso Archi’s retirement, his
Consequently, our work was to identify the meaning of the
position as full professor was changed into a position of
words, the lexicon. Nowadays, on the contrary, it is possible to
researcher for three years. In Italy there is more a net of
go deeper and to have a more complete view. The secondary
universities: you are enrolled somewhere but you also try and
literature al ows you to confront your own research with that of
go to study in another university because there is something
other colleagues: that is how we can now work on the
m i s s i n g . F o r e x a m p l e B o l o g n a i s n o w v e r y g o o d f o r
reconstruction of the Hittite world.
Archaeology, and there is Egyptology too, but there is no
Hittitology or Assyriology. Florence is very good for Hittitology
Could you tell us how your interest in different topics has
but there are very few Assyriologists.
changed throughout your career?
Do you think chances for young researchers are similar today to
I started with this very strange topic about dance and music;
those available decades ago?
then I moved to the Hurrian texts and the political history; and
now I can say that I have tried to work on every different
In Italy the situation is bad, but not only for Hittitology; it is
typology of texts. I am quite interested in everything, and
also bad for medical sciences, and for more practical
sometimes it happens that col eagues invite me to give a talk in
disciplines. It is very sad, but in Italy the government is not
a conference or to give a lecture on a topic on which I have
investing enough on research. As a consequence, young
never worked before. But I accept it because it is a chal enge to
people have to go abroad. Germany has initially a lot of
do something new, and since I feel Hittitology is not so wide a
opportunities. It is possible to survive there for ten years,
field, I think we can work on very different subjects. I also
however getting a Chair afterwards is very difficult: only one out
consider it useful to know every typology of text and every kind
of fifty people get a permanent position. Another possibility lies
of problem, because in this way you can understand the Hittite
in grants from the United States or Canada. I think it is no longer
civilization as a whole.
possible to remain in one place; we have to take every
possibility, every chance. The Old World is undergoing a very
In 2008 you published, together with Mauro Giorgeri, the
difficult situation, and therefore research and impractical topics
Literatur zum Hurritischen Lexikon (LHL), Band 1, A. Do you
are not being favored at the moment.
have plans to continue with this project?
Looking back in time, do you see big changes in Hittitology as a
At the moment we have stopped because we both have
scientific discipline?
other projects, but we want to continue. Other col eagues have
already incited us to go on since they consider the book to be
Yes, I think Hittitology has developed a lot. If I remember well,
useful, so we will, for sure!
when I studied at the university during the mid-seventies, there
was only one volume of Hittite research published every year.
Do you have any other collaborative projects at the moment?
Now there are many and there are also thousands and
thousands of new tablets that have been discovered and
Yes, I have a project on all the aspects connected to water,
published by scholars from al over the world. In Italy, during the
practical and archaeological, together with many other
sixties, Hittitology was limited to a number of people. But now
coetaneous Italian colleagues. I also have a project together
we are a pretty large bunch of people. You, for example, are
with Clelia Mora and Nicolò Marchetti about Karkemish, and
yourself a young Hittitologist from Buenos Aires: no one would
then we will go on with the Hurrian texts. Right now, we are
have thought of this, even a decade ago. Therefore, we can see
working together with Gernot Wilhelm, Mauro Giorgeri and
that Hittitology has been increasingly developing; that more
Aygül Süel on the Ortaköy texts. Everyday, day by day, there is
people are working on the Hittite texts, and with better results.
something more to do ■
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
4


» New Project
THE CHALCOLITHIC
IN PALESTINE
A Research Project from Argentina
Pablo F. Jaruf University of Buenos Air
|
es
rgentinean researchers Ianir Milevski and Bernardo
A
University of Luján. Dr. Ianir I. Milevski is a Research
Gandulla received a substancial endowment by the
Archaeologist at the Israel Antiquities Authority, Associate
National Fund for Scientific and Technological Research (Fondo
Fel ow in the W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research
para la Investigación Científica y Tecnológica) to carry out their
in Jerusalem, and President of the Forum for the Research of
p ro j e c t o n “ E c o n o m y a n d S o c i e t y i n t h e P a l e s t i n e a n
the Chalcolithic Period. The research group also includes Prof.
Chalcolithic (4500-3700 BC): Production and Exchange” (PICT
Ana M. Fund Patrón, former Director of the Instituto de Historia
Bicentenario 2010 N° 0883).
Antigua Oriental “Dr. A. Rosenvasser” (University of Buenos
Aires), and three junior researchers: Gabriela Lemma, Luciano
This project aims to define, mainly from the perspective of
Esteban Monti and Martín Rivadero Paiva. Besides, Pablo
historical materialism, the specific organization of those
Federico Jaruf holds a doctoral fellowship within the framework
societies that inhabited the Southern Levant during the
of this project.
Chalcolithic period. Furthermore, the research team seeks to
o u t l i n e a c o m p re h e n s i v e m o d e l o f s o c i o - e c o n o m i c
The first results were included in a paper entitled “Minor Arts
development taking into account regional and cultural
and the Chalcolithic of the Southern Levant,” read at the 8th
variables.
International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near
East. The project was formally presented to the scientific
Dr. Bernardo Gandulla, main researcher of the project,
community in a conference about metalurgy and trade in the
teaches at the University of Buenos Aires and the National
Oriental Mediterranean which took place in Krakow ■
SUMMER IN GATH
Tel es Safi, located near Hebron, is one of the largest sites in Israel. Since
1996, this place has been excavated by a team of archaeologists under
the direction of Prof. Aren Maeir from Bar-Ilan University. Around 150
volunteers from different countries joined the project last summer.
On July 2012 I had the opportunity to participate in the Tell es-Safi/Gath
Archaeological Project thanks to a grant from the ADAR Foundation. This
experience provided not only practical training but also fieldwork
instruction through daily lectures on relevant issues related to the project
and trips to other archaeological sites.
Jorge Cano Moreno | Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina
5
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER


» Discovery in Egypt
SOLAR FUNERARY
From the
BOAT First Dynasty
Carolina Quintana | University of Buenos Aires / CONICET
he Antiquities Minister of Egypt, Mohamed Ibrahim,
T
undertake an after-death journey to achieve eternal life. The
announced the discovery of a funerary boat dating to the
remains of the funerary boat were transferred to the new
reign of Den (ca. 2975-2935 BC), one of the kings of the First
National Museum of Egyptian Civilization (NMEC) in order to
Dynasty.
carry out restoration procedures, and will be exhibited in the
“Nile” room.
The ship was recovered at Abu Rawash, in the northeastern
area of the Giza Plateau, by the French archaeological mission
This institution was promoted by the Ministry of Culture and
directed by Yann Tristan (French Institute for Oriental
UNESCO to explore and exhibit the history of the inhabitants of
Archaeology in Cairo [IFAO]). It was unearthed in an ancient
ancient Egypt, using 150.000 artifacts selected from different
royal cemetery: these sacred ships were buried together with
museums ■
wealthy individuals who believed that their soul would
Ancient ship found at Abu Rawash.
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
6

» Obituary
In memoriam:
ITAMAR SINGER
Itamar Singer, Professor of Ancient Near Eastern History and Cultures at Tel Aviv University, passed away on September
19, 2012. Prof. Singer, along with his wife Dr. Graciela Gestoso Singer, col aborated extensively with the scholarly life of
the CEHAO and its members. He encouraged young students by providing advice as wel as specific bibliography, and
by establishing academic connections with other renowned scholars. For al of these reasons the editors of Damqātum
decided to include the following obituary, which was taken from the Agade mailing list.
by Yoram Cohen, Amir Gilan and Jared Miller
“Life is bound up with death and death is bound up with life.
From 1973 to 1975 Itamar continued his Hittite studies with
A human does not live forever. The days of his life are
Heinrich Otten in Marburg. His dissertation, ‘The KI.LAM
counted.”
Festival’, completed in 1978, was published in Studien zu
‘Prayer of Kantuzili’ (translation by Itamar Singer)
Bogazkoy-Texten (1983-1984). It was the first complete edition
of a major Hittite festival and it quickly became a highly
influential study of Hittite religion.
tamar Singer was born on the 26th of November 1946 in Dej,
IRumania. His parents, both Holocaust survivors, met in Upon returning to Israel, Itamar joined the staff of the
Rumania after the War. His mother Gertrude came from a
Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern
German-speaking family from Tchernovitz, Bukovina, his father
Cultures, where he became a ful professor in 1996 and where
Z o l t á n f ro m a H u n g a r i a n - s p e a k i n g f a m i l y f ro m D e j ,
he continued teaching until his retirement in 2006. Between
Transylvania. Itamar’s father, a community leader, was
1984 and 1995 he also taught at other institutions in Israel.
repeatedly imprisoned by the communist regime for his Zionist
activities, until emigration visas, after years of denial, were finally
Itamar’s primary interests in the historical domain lay in the
granted in 1958. Upon their arrival in Israel, the family settled in
international affairs of the 13th century BC, the Golden Age of
Holon, which then became home for Itamar. During one
what he has termed the pax hethitica. Many of his studies dealt
summer vacation from high school Itamar participated as a
with the diplomatic relations between Hatti and the other great
volunteer in the Arad excavations conducted by Yohanan
powers as well as with the Hittite domination of Syria, and
Aharoni, his first experience in field archaeology.
especially the kingdoms of Amurru and Ugarit. At the same
time, his continued interest in Anatolian religions led to an
From 1965 to 1968 Itamar studied at the Hebrew University
edition and in-depth study of Muwattalli’s Prayer (1996). His
in Jerusalem, obtaining his B.A. in the departments of
interest in the prayer genre culminated in his English
Archaeology and Geography. During these and the following
translations of the best-preserved ‘Hittite Prayers’ in the
years he participated in excavations at Megiddo, Beersheva,
Writings from the Ancient World series (2002).
Tel Malhata, Tel Masos and Hanita. From 1969 to 1973 he
fulfilled his military duty as an officer in the Air Force, serving as
Published in 2009, Itamar’s book ‘Ha-hittim ve tarbutam’
an aerial-photograph interpreter. Simultaneously, he completed
(‘The Hittites and their Culture’) was the first full-length
his M.A. studies at Tel Aviv University in the Department of
treatment of Hittite history and culture to appear in Hebrew. Its
Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures. His M.A.
publication was the realization of Itamar’s long-standing desire
thesis ‘Geographical Aspects of the Proto-Hattian Problem’,
to present Hebrew readers with a more accessible route to a
written under the supervision of Aharon Kempinski, anticipated
distant culture from long ago, one that nonetheless maintains
his future research into the ties between history, geography and
much relevance for those interested in the history of Israel and
theology.
the whole region in antiquity. This book has sparked an interest
7
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER

in all things Hittite for many young students who study
classes and seminars on Hittite language and culture were
Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern studies.
regularly attended by students from numerous universities.
Itamar’s commitment to his research and teaching was
In 2011 a volume titled ‘The Calm before the Storm’ (edited
contagious, and despite the relative obscurity and humble
by Billie-Jean Collins) brought together over 40 of Itamar’s
resources of the field, he supervised over the years a large
previously published studies, including his political histories of
number of MA and PhD theses. His belief in and personal
Ugarit and Amurru. The volume’s epilogue includes his defence
concern for his students led him to involve many graduate and
of Hittite historiography as a response to postmodern trends in
undergraduate students in his research projects. Several of his
a n c i e n t N e a r E a s t e r n s t u d i e s , d r i v e n b y h i s l i f e l o n g
former students now hold academic positions in Israel and
commitment to the search for the historical truth. A volume of
abroad.
contributions from col eagues, friends and students in honour
of Itamar entitled ‘Pax Hethitica’ and edited by his former
Itamar was married to Graciela Noemi Gestoso, an
students was published in Studien zu den Bogazkoy-Texten
Argentinian Egyptologist. Alongside his academic duties and
(2010). In 2010 Itamar was awarded the prestigious Emet Prize,
interests, Itamar has been involved in various philanthropic and
sponsored by the Office of the Prime Minister of Israel.
political activities, notably the Israeli Peace Movement.
During his long tenure at Tel Aviv Itamar carried almost
Itamar passed away on the m or ning of the 19th of
single-handedly the banner of Hittite studies in Israel, and his
September 2012 after battling a long illness ■
THE UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER | FACULTY OF LIFE SCIENCES | KNH CENTRE FOR BIOMEDICAL EGYPTOLOGY
CERTIFICATE IN EGYPTOLOGY
A three year programme which provides an opportunity for the serious, academic study of Egyptology
delivered entirely on-line.
Programme Director: Professor Rosalie David / Course Tutor: Dr. Joyce Tyldesley
Year 1: From Predynastic Egypt to the Hyksos Period.
Year 2: From the beginning of the New Kingdom to the establishment of Dynasty 19.
Year 3: From the Later New Kingdom to the Arab conquest.
[The study of hieroglyphs will form an integral part of the course.] For further details please visit our
website: www.knhcentre.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/certificateinegyptology
SHORT COURSES IN EGYPTOLOGY
Six week, non-credit bearing courses in Egyptology-related topics delivered entirely on-line.
Programme Director: Professor Rosalie David / Course Tutor: Dr. Joyce Tyldesley
Courses include:
- Queens of Ancient Egypt
- Warfare and Weapons of Ancient Egypt
- The Temple in Ancient Egypt
For a full list of courses, please visit our website. Courses start in October, February and May.
For further details please visit our website: www.knhcentre.manchester.ac.uk/continuingeducation
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
8


» New Discoveries
QUEEN OF
SHEBA Genetics
María de los Ángeles Picone Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina
|
he mystery of the Queen of Sheba and her reign is closer
T
h o m i n i d d i s c o v e r i e s t o o k p l a c e , s u c h a s L u c y — t h e
to being solved. Although the Jewish-Muslim tradition
Australopithecus afarensis. Despite the relevance that this area
locates the Kingdom of Sheba in modern Yemen, the medieval
may have for our understanding of evolutionary genetics, only a
Ethiopian tradition—according to its sacred book, the Kebra
few studies deal with the Ethiopian genome in a comprehensive
Nagast—includes this place in its own land. Lack of conclusive
manner.
archaeological or textual evidence has led scholars to analyze
the available sources in a thorough fashion, using data from
Nevertheless, genetic information is not the sole evidence
other fields such as evolutionary genetics.
that proves the connection between Ethiopia and extra-African
domains. Linguistic data is also important in this respect:
D r. To o m a s K i v i s i l d ( C a m b r i d g e ) i s a b i o l o g i c a l
Kivisild and his colleagues discovered that those individuals
anthropologist who has studied the cultural, linguistic and
who had non-African components in half of their genes spoke
historical diversity of Ethiopia in order to understand African
Semitic or Cushitic languages.
variability and the origin of human beings. In one of his papers,
written together with other anthropologists and biologists, he
These new results and the suggested chronology fit in a
examined the genetic components of 235 Ethiopian, Somali
temporal range that had been already boosted by other
and South-Sudanese individuals. The results revealed a strong
linguistic studies proposing a linkage between the Middle East
non-African genetic component, very similar to that of some
and Ethiopia during the first millennium BCE. Besides, this
Levantine populations, which could be explained by a genetic
theory is reinforced by the stories about the Queen of Sheba,
flow that took place around 3000 years ago. Furthermore, this
who according to the Kebra Nagast had a son with King
study also confirms that Ethiopian populations are newer than
Solomon. During this period, different trading routes were
those of the southern part of Africa.
established between both regions: in fact, Ethiopian cultural
diversity seems to respond to the tight bonds that fol owed the
Ethiopia is an exceptional region that anchors significant
institution of trade, which allowed the flow of non-African
evidence for the study of the origin of mankind and the first
genetic components into the Horn of Africa ■
societies. It is a gateway between Asia and Africa were major
The Queen of Sheba before King Solomon, by Jacopo Tintoretto (c. 1543).
9
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DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER

» Research Article
THE SO-CALLED
OSIRIS BED
in Ancient Egypt
Amgad Elwakeel Helwan University / University of Liverpool
|
amgad.elwakeel@liv.ac.uk
he so-called Osiris bed is one of the most remarkable
Schraff argues the Osiris bed was first produced during the
Treligious funerary equipments that were placed inside the Second Dynasty.[12] His opinion is supported by the discovery
royal and elite private tombs, notably during the New Kingdom.
of a wooden object that looks like an Osiris bed in store
It represents not only Osiris’ resurrection, but also reveals the
chamber (d) inside tomb number 2498 at Saqqara, which dates
fertility aspects of the god and his relation to Nile water, earth,
back to the same period.[13] It was discovered by Quibel , who
mud, vegetation and barley, as well as with god Neper. In this
described this object as “an oblong litter consisting of matting
article I display the historical development of the Osiris bed
stretched on four poles.”[14] Moreover, he mentioned that a
since it made its first appearance as well as the religious and
quantity of grain laid above it in the husk, and wonders if this
funerary significance of such bed with the aim of shedding light
was the Osiris bed of later days.[15]
on its importance in the Egyptian religion in general and the
However, the fact that this tomb dates back to the Second
Osirian theology in particular.
Dynasty suggests this object is not an Osiris bed because the
cult of this god did not appear until later.[16] Moreover, it is
I. History and Development of the Osiris Bed
possible that the quantities of grain found above it were placed
inside the tomb as provision and nourishment for the deceased
The Osiris bed can be defined as an outline figure of Osiris
in the afterlife, and thus may have no connection with Osiris and
made out of thin strips of wood,[1] surmounted with the so-
the idea of the germinated barley. This object was found in the
cal ed atf-crown, holding the royal insignias and facing right.[2]
center of seven rooms containing pottery jars for keeping
However, in some other cases the Osiris bed faces the left
vegetables or fat remains [17]; therefore, it is not possible that
side.[3]
the aforementioned object was an Osiris bed, since this kind of
The figure of the god is hollowed to receive mud as well as
beds were usually placed inside the burial chamber of the
seeds of grain and barley, which grow before inserting the figure
tomb.[18]
inside the tomb.[4] These beds were wrapped in linen
A small number of Osiris beds were discovered in royal
bandages like a mummy as a kind of identification between the
tombs; e.g. the Osiris beds of Tutankhamun,[19] Horemheb[20]
deceased and god Osiris.[5] In some cases a papyrus
and Amenhotep II.[21] Moreover, these beds were also found in
mat—covered with a stretched double piece of coarse
private tombs: the Osiris bed of Maiherperi was discovered
linen—was placed above the god’s figure.[6]
inside his tomb at the Val ey of the Kings,[22] and the two beds
However, it is obvious that the term ‘Osiris bed’ does not
of Amunemhat and his wife Baketamun were probably placed
apply to a real bed with its characteristics. Another reference to
inside their tomb at Qurna.[23] Besides, two Osiris beds were
the Osiris bed is ‘cereal bed’[7] or ‘corn Osiris’[8]: these names
discovered inside the tomb of Yuia and Thuiu at the Valley of the
symbolize growth, fertility and rebirth of god Osiris.[9] Despite
Kings. Both of them consist of a rectangular frame of wood
the fact that the majority of these beds date to the New
surmounted with an outlined figure of Osiris facing the left
Kingdom,[10] they appeared during the Twelfth Dynasty
side.[24] The discovery of such beds inside royal and high
(Middle Kingdom). The earliest known Osiris bed was
officials tombs probably suggests that they were restricted to
discovered at the entrance of the pyramid of King Senusert II at
commoners.
El-Lahun,[11] but it takes a rectangular shape rather than that of
On the surface of some Osiris beds there was a papyrus mat,
the Osiris figure.
above it there was a stretched double cover of coarse linen, and
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DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
10


then a bed of mould was placed above it taking the shape and
crown.[32] Similarly to the Osiris beds, corn-mummies
characteristics of god Osiris. The figure was planted with seeds
appeared during the Middle Kingdom.[33] However, their main
of grain and barley[25] and a double piece of cloth was placed
function is related to the mysteries of Osiris’ cult. An inscription
over the sprouts where they grow up to a height of 15
on a chapel roof inside the temple of Dendera explains the
centimeters; then the whole figure was wrapped in strips of
religious rituals for Osiris including the interment of a corn-
coarse linen.[26] The average length of the Osiris bed is around
mummy each year[34]: this text symbolizes the germination
150 centimeters.[27]
and sprouting of barley and corn seeds.[35]
Osiris beds were made inside al the chief towns’ temples of
Another difference between corn-mummies and Osiris beds
Egypt in the second half of the fourth month of the Axt or
is their provenance: the former were mainly excavated from
inundation season. Simultaneously, the same act was
simple pits located at specific sites including Wadi Qubbanet el-
performed by the kA priests inside the tombs. The idea of the
Qirud, Tihna el-Gebel, El-Sheikh Fadl and Tuna el-Gebel.[36]
germinated Osiris represented in the Osiris bed continued until
Furthermore, they were made during the Khoiak[37] or Nhb-
the Graeco-Roman Period, as demonstrated by a scene in the
kAw[38] festival on the first day of the fifth month of the year.[39]
Philae temple.[28] Moreover, Ptolemaic rituals included the
making of Osiris beds inside the main sanctuaries every year in
II. Religious Significance of the Osiris Bed
the form of Osiris’ effigy.[29]
Finally, it is noteworthy to differentiate between the Osiris bed
A remarkable text that mentions the conditions and
and the corn-mummy: the two terms were confused because
necessary requirements for making an Osiris bed may be of
the corn-mummy was probably the continuation of the Osiris
interest in order to determine the religious significance of this
bed in later periods, especially during the Graeco-Roman
artifact.[40] In fact, only a few texts provide information about it
Period.[30] The term “corn-mummy” was used to describe a
and explain its religious meaning, but the most important one
type of anthropomorphic funerary object made of alluvial soil
comes from the tomb of Neferhotep at Sheikh Abd el-
mixed with seeds of barley and corn. It is wrapped like a
Qurna.[41]
mummy with linen bandages and provided with a mask of wax
This text mentions that similar Osiris beds were made from
taking the shape of Osiris’ face in green color.[31]
the 23rd to the 30th day of the third month of the summer.[42]
Corn-mummies take the miniature shape of god Osiris in a
The text incites the deceased to awake from his sleep,[43] as
mummified position with his typical emblems and in some
this act symbolizes the resurrection of the deceased through
cases with an erect phal us, wearing the atf-crown or the white
the Osiris bed and the sprouting of its barley.[44] The role of god
Figure 1. The Osiris bed of Yuia. Photo by Amgad Elwakeel.
11
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER


Figure 2. The Osiris bed of Thuiu. Photo by Amgad Elwakeel.
Horus in the resurrection and awakening of his father Osiris is
presiding god.[51] In this place, calves thresh corn to ensure a
also mentioned in the same text. It also refers to a strange role
good harvest. In fact, this ritual has nothing to do with Osiris, as
of the Four Sons of Horus represented in bringing libation water,
the presiding god here is Horus or the ithyphallic Atum.[52]
which will fertilize the earth bed.
However, these gods were replaced later on by Osiris in the
The text mentions the creation of the Osiris bed during the
temple of Horus at Edfu.[53] This replacement led Blackman
18th day of the fourth month of inundation and the aim of
and Fairman to suggest that the threshing floor in this ritual is
making the bed, represented in the rebirth and resurrection of
the tomb of Osiris in his capacity as a corn-god and the act of
the deceased. In fact, there is a strong association between the
trampling on the floor by the calves aims to hide the tomb of
Osiris bed and the growth of corn and barley. This association
Osiris from the sight of his enemies, especially Seth.[54]
started at least during the Middle Kingdom, when certain
According to Gardiner, there is an old belief that identifies
connections between the cult of Osiris and fertility and growth
Osiris with barley and, at the same time, with god Neper.[55]
of corn appeared.[45]
Two texts support his opinion. The first was mentioned by
The earliest text that deals with such association is the
Lacau, who gave two spells of the Coffin Texts.[56] The same
Dramatic Ramesseum Papyrus.[46] In this text, Seth is
text was also mentioned by De Buck.[57] This text shows the
described as a donkey and Osiris as barley; then Horus orders
identification between Osiris and Neper, where it reads, “I live
Seth and his followers not to trample on his father. However, the
and grow as Neper.” However, there is some doubt concerning
asses did trample the barley: “Beating Osiris: hacking the god
this identification as it is not known for sure whether these
to pieces: barley” (line 31).[47] Hence, the sowing of seeds in
words represent a continuation of Osiris’ speech or the words
the mud soil forming the outline of Osiris in the Osiris bed
of Neper.
symbolizes the murder of Osiris by Seth, while the eventual
The second text that confirms Gardiner’s view is mentioned
sprouting of the barley would, in turn, have symbolized the
in Spel 142 in the Book of the Dead. Here the name of Osiris is
victory, rebirth and resurrection of Osiris or the deceased
followed by the title xnty-Npr, which means, “the foremost
identified with him.[48] According to Helck, the previous story
one,[58] Neper.” There is no doubt that the growth of barley
was drawn from the legend of Osiris and Isis.[49] In addition, it is
from the soil is the most striking symbolism for rebirth and
considered a commentary on one of the ancient rituals. This is
resurrection of Osiris.[59] In fact, Osiris was identified with
evident, from his point of view, through the inscriptions on the
barley in two scenes mentioned in the Memphite Theology.[60]
wal s of the sun temple of King Sahure which describe part of a
In the story of the struggle of Horus and Seth in the Memphite
ceremony or ritual called “Driving the Calves.”[50]
Theology, Osiris answers Re: “Wherefore shall my son Horus be
This ritual was performed on the threshing floor of the
defrauded, seeing that it is I who make you strong, and it is I
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DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
12

who made the barley and the emmer to nourish the gods, and
Amenemhēt (No. 82). London, p. 115. This opinion is also
even so the living creatures after the gods.”[61] Ikram and
supported by the scattering of grain over the corpse of the
Dobson think that the idea of the Osiris bed was inspired by
deceased attested at Merimda Beni Salama; see H. Junker.
Spell 269 of the Coffin Texts,[62] entitled “Becoming barley of
1930. Vorläufiger ger Bericht uber Merimde Benisalame. Wien,
Lower Egypt.”[63]
p. 151.
The Osiris bed reflects the connection between Osiris and
19. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
the cycle of vegetation and growth.[64] Therefore, god Osiris is
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120, fig. 120;
shown in some representations with green color symbolizing
H. Carter, D. E. Derry and A. Lucas. 1963. The Tomb of
vegetation and fertility.[65] Finally, the Osiris bed explicitly
Tutankhamun. Discovered by the Late Earl of Carnarvon and
indicates the resurrection of Osiris and consequently the
Howard Carter, Vol. III. New York, p. 61, pl. LXIV.
deceased identified with the god ■
20. Th. M. Davis, G. Maspero and G. Daressy. 2001. The
Tombs of Harmhabi and Touatânkhamanou. London, p. 105,
Notes
pl. LXXXVIII.
21. M. G. Daressy. 1902. Catalogue général des antiquités
1. W. J. Darby, P. Ghalioungui and L. Grivetti. 1976. Food:
égyptiennes du Musée du Caire nos 24001-24990. Fouil es de
The Gift of Osiris, Vol. 2. New York, p. 483.
la Vallee des Rois (1898-1899). Cairo, pp. 170, 173, pl. XXXVIII.
2. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
2
22. PM I , pp. 556-557; M. G. Daressy. 1902. Catalogue
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
général des antiquités égyptiennes du Musée du Caire nos
3. M. J. E. Quibell. 1908. Catalogue général des antiquités
24001-24990. Fouilles de la Vallee des Rois (1898-1899).
égyptiennes du Musée du Caire nos 51001-51191. Tomb of
Cairo, pp. 25-26, pl. VII.
Yuaa and Thuiu. Cairo, p. 45.
23. N. de G. Davies and A. H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of
4. Contra P. Lacovara and B. T. Trope (eds.). 2001. The
Amenemhēt (No. 82). London, p. 115.
Realm of Osiris. Mummies, Coffins, and Ancient Egyptian
24. Th. M. Davis, G. Maspero, P. E. Newberry and H. Carter.
Funerary Art in the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Atlanta, p. 17.
1907. The Tomb of Iouiya and Touiyou. London, p. 45; M. J. E.
5. W. J. Darby, P. Ghalioungui and L. Grivetti. 1976. Food:
Quibell. 1908. Catalogue général des antiquités égyptiennes
The Gift of Osiris, Vol. 2. New York, p. 483.
du Musée du Caire nos 51001-51191. Tomb of Yuaa and
6. N. de G. Davies and A.H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of
Thuiu. Cairo, pp. 35-36.
Amenemhēt (No. 82). London, p. 115.
25. M. Lurker. 2002. An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods
7. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
and Symbols of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 41.
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
26. M. J. E. Quibel . 1908. Catalogue général des antiquités
8. P. Lacovara and B. T. Trope (eds.). 2001. The Realm of
égyptiennes du Musée du Caire nos 51001-51191. Tomb of
Osiris. Mummies, Coffins, and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Art in
Yuaa and Thuiu. Cairo, p. 35; M. G. Daressy. 1902. Catalogue
the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Atlanta, p. 17.
général des antiquités égyptiennes du Musée du Caire nos
9. P. Lacovara and B. T. Trope (eds.). 2001. The Realm of
24001-24990. Fouilles de la Vallee des Rois (1898-1899).
Osiris. Mummies, Coffins, and Ancient Egyptian Funerary Art in
Cairo, pp. 25-26.
the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Atlanta, p. 17.
27. N. de G. Davies and A.H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of
10. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
Amenemhēt (No. 82). London, p. 115.
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
28. L. Lamy. 1981. Egyptian Mysteries: New Light on
11. W. M. Fl. Petrie, G. Brunton and M.A. Murray. 1923.
Ancient Knowledge. Lancashire, p. 22.
Lahun II. London, p. 6.
29. H. Frankfort. 1948. Kingship and the Gods. A study of
12. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p. 111.
Ancient Near Eastern Religion as the Integration of Society &
13. J. E. Quibell. 1923. Archaic Mastabas. Excavations at
Nature. Chicago, p. 186.
Saqqara 1912-1914. Cairo, pl. XXV, p. 2.
30. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
14. J. E. Quibell. 1923. Archaic Mastabas. Excavations at
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
Saqqara 1912-1914. Cairo, p. 10.
31. M.J. Raven. 1982. “Corn-mummies.” In: OMRO 63, p. 7.
15. J. E. Quibell. 1923. Archaic Mastabas. Excavations at
32. I. Shaw and P. T. Nicholson. 1997. British Museum
Saqqara 1912-1914. Cairo, pp. 44-46.
Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 72.
16. 12. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p.
33. I. Shaw and P. T. Nicholson. 1997. British Museum
111.
Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 72.
17. J. E. Quibell. 1923. Archaic Mastabas. Excavations at
34. M. J. Raven. 1982. “Corn-mummies.” In: OMRO 63, p.
Saqqara 1912-1914. Cairo, p. 44.
8.
18. N. de G. Davies and A.H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of
35. S. Ikram and A. Dodson. 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
13
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER


Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
Luxor and Deir el-Bahari temples, see A. Gayet. 1894. Le
36. I. Shaw and P. T. Nicholson. 1997. British Museum
temple de Louxor. Paris, pl. IX; É. Navil e. 1906. The Temple of
Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 72.
Deir El Bahari, Plates CXIX-CL. The Upper Court and
37. It was the last month of the inundation season and time
Sanctuary, Vol. V. London, pl. 134.
of sowing, see J.G. Griffiths. 1970. Plutarch’s De Iside et
52. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p. 107.
Osiride. Wales, pp. 312-313.
53. A. M. Blackman and H. W. Fairman. 1950. “The
38. A. H. Gardiner. 1915. “Notices of Recent Publications.”
Significance of the Ceremony hwt bhsw in the Temple of Horus
In: JEA 2, pp. 123-124.
at Edfu.” In: JEA 36, p. 79.
39. J. H. Taylor. 2001. Death and the Afterlife in Ancient
54. A. M. Blackman and H. W. Fairman. 1950. “The
Egypt. London, p. 212.
Significance of the Ceremony hwt bhsw in the Temple of Horus
40. After the translation of A. H. Gardiner, see N. de G.
at Edfu.” In: JEA 36, p. 80.
Davies and A. H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of Amenemhēt (No.
55. A. H. Gardiner. 1931. The Library of A. Chester Beatty.
82). London, p. 115.
Description of a Hieratic Papyrus with a Mythological Story,
41. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p. 110.
Love-Songs, and Other Miscellaneous Texts. The Chester
42. After the translation of A. H. Gardiner, see N. de G.
Beatty Papyri, No I. London, pp. 24-25, n. 1.
Davies and A. H. Gardiner. 1915. The Tomb of Amenemhēt (No.
56. M. P. Lacau. 1910. Textes religieux égyptiens. Paris, no
82). London, p. 116.
58.
43. This is clear through the following part of the text: “O
57. A. De Buck. 1951. The Egyptian Coffin Texts IV. Texts of
Osiris Neferhotep, raise thyself upon the left side.”
Spells 268-354. Chicago, spell 330.
44. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p. 111;
58. Wb III, 308, 7.
M. Lurker. 2002. An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods and
59. H. Frankfort. 1948. Kingship and the Gods. A study of
Symbols of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 41.
Ancient Near Eastern Religion as the Integration of Society &
45. I. Shaw and P. T. Nicholson. 1997. British Museum
Nature. Chicago, p. 185.
Dictionary of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 72.
60. J. G. Griffiths. 1996. The Origins of Osiris. Berlin, p. 62.
46. K. Sethe. 1964. Dramatische Texte zu Altaegyptischen
61. After the translation of A.H. Gardiner, see A. H. Gardiner.
Mysterienspielen. Hildesheim, p. 134.
1931. The Library of A. Chester Beatty. Description of a Hieratic
47. K. Sethe. 1964. Dramatische Texte zu Altaegyptischen
Papyrus with a Mythological Story, Love-Songs, and Other
Mysterienspielen. Hildesheim, p. 134.
Miscel aneous Texts. The Chester Beatty Papyri, No I. London,
48. M. Lurker. 2002. An Illustrated Dictionary of the Gods
pp. 24-25.
and Symbols of Ancient Egypt. London, p. 41.
62. S. Ikram and A. Dodson, 1998. The Mummy in Ancient
49. W. Helck. 1954. “Bemerkungen zum Rituel des
Egypt. Equipping the Dead for Eternity. Cairo, p. 120.
Dramatische en Ramesseumpapyrus.” In: Orientalia 23, pp.
63. R. O. Faulkner. 1973. The Ancient Egyptian Coffin Texts I.
383-411.
Spells 1-354. Warminster, p. 205.
50. A. M. Blackman and H. W. Fairman. 1950. “The
64. R. H. W ilkinson. 2003. The Complete Gods and
Significance of the Ceremony hwt bhsw in the Temple of Horus
Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Cairo, p. 122.
at Edfu.” In: JEA 36, p. 76.
65. R. H. W ilkinson. 2003. The Complete Gods and
51. Scenes describing this ritual are depicted on the wal s of
Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Cairo, p. 120.
CONSTRUCTS OF PROPHECY IN THE FORMER
AND LATTER PROPHETS AND OTHER TEXTS
Edited by Lester L. Grabbe and Martti Nissinen.
New volume in the Ancient Near East Monographs series.
Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature / Centro de Estudios de Historia del Antiguo
Oriente, 2011. 247 pp. ISBN 978-1-58983-599-3.
This collection of essays, arising from the meetings of the SBL’s Prophetic Texts and
Their Ancient Contexts Group, examines how prophecy has been constructed in
biblical literature such as the Former Prophets, the Latter Prophets, Chronicles, and
Daniel, and even in the Qur’an.
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
14


» Exhibition
IN THE LIGHT OF AMARNA:
100 YEARS OF THE NEFERTITI
DISCOVERY
7.12.2012 - 4.08.2013
special exhibition on the so-called Amarna period was
A
BC. At the beginning of the 20th century the German
organized at the Neues Museum on Berlin’s Museum
Egyptologist Ludwig Borchardt, assisted by the art patron
Island in order to celebrate the centenary of Nefertiti’s bust
James Simon, led extraordinary successful excavations at Tell
relocation from the Nile Val ey. The name ‘Amarna’ refers to the
el-Amarna: among the 10.000 archaeological objects found
ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Akhetaton, which today is
there was the colourful bust of Nefertiti. The exhibition
known as Tel el-Amarna. Pharaoh Akhenaten (Amenhotep IV,
comprises approximately 400 objects, including 50 loans from
c. 1351-1334 BC) founded a new capital with newly built
museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Louvre
temples for his own ‘religion of light’.
and the British Museum ■
W ith the retur n to the old religious tradition under
Adapted from the authorized press release in German by Diana
Tutankhamun, Akhetaton was gradually abandoned by 1331
Liesegang (Heidelberg University).
Bust of Queen Nefertiti, Neues Museum. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Photo: Achim Kleuker.
15
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER



» Scholarly Activities
CEHAO INVITED SCHOLARS 2012
Conference - March 20, 2012.
Conference - August 1, 2012.
Prof. David Ussishkin
Prof. Ze’ev Herzog
SENNACHERIB’S CAMPAIGN TO JUDAH,
THE CULT REMAINS AT ARAD AND TEL
LACHISH AND JERUSALEM.
BEER-SHEBA AND THE EVIDENCE FOR
RELIGIOUS REFORMS IN THE KINGDOM
OF JUDAH.
The focus of this ambitious series is on the ancient Near East, including ancient
CEHAO/SBL
Israel and its literature, from the early Neolithic to the early Hellenistic eras. Studies
that are heavily philological or archaeological are both suited to this series, and can
ANCIENT NEAR EAST
take full advantage of the hypertext capabilities of “born digital” publication.
Multiple author and edited volumes as well as monographs are accepted.
MONOGRAPHS
Proposals and manuscripts may be submitted in either English or Spanish.
Manuscripts are peer reviewed by at least two scholars in the area before
acceptance. Published volumes wil be held to the high scholarly standards of the
SBL and the Centro de Estudios de Historia del Antiguo Oriente.
ANTIGUO ORIENTE
TABLE OF CONTENTS (Articles)
VOLUME 10
- Tributo a Itamar Singer / A Tribute to Itamar Singer
A Tribute to Itamar Singer
- Lmlk Seal Impressions Once Again: A Second Rejoinder to Oded
Lipschits | David Ussishkin
A special volume of Antiguo Oriente, the scholarly
- Entre Syrie et Mésopotamie: vases zoomorphes du Règne de
Mittani | Alessandra Cel erino, Alan Arbore, Enrico Foietta, Alessia
journal published by the CEHAO, was presented as a
Massolo, Jessica Meneghetti & Enrica Ottino
tribute to the late Prof. Itamar Singer.
- La figura regia de Hatshepsut: Una propuesta de análisis a partir
de tres cambios ontológicos | Virginia Laporta
NEW EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
- The Verb i-KU-PU-šum in the Shamash-Temple Brick Inscription |
Adam E. Miglio
In 2012 Dr. Juan Manuel Tebes assumed the editorship
of Antiguo Oriente, as well as the directorship of the
- Consideraciones sobre los relieves del “árbol sagrado” asirio en
CEHAO. He succeeds Prof. Roxana Flammini, who
el Palacio Noroeste de Aššurnasirpal II (Nimrud) | Romina Della
Casa
founded the journal in 2003 and was its Editor-in-Chief
until last year. Lic. Virginia Laporta is the new Associate
- Arquitectura y funcionalidad del Gran Templo de Requem | Arturo
Editor.
Sánchez Sanz
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
16

» Scholarly Activities
CEHAO SCHOLARLY PARTICIPATION
2011/12
Paris, December 8-9, 2011.
Paris, May 3, 2012.
ROUND TABLE: PERIODISATIONS, TERRITOIRES,
CONFERENCE: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL
ARCHITECTURE ET MATERIEL AU PROCHE-ORIENT.
ROUND-TABLE. THE ARABIAN TRADE: BETWEEN IMAGE
Mission archéologique française en Syrie du Sud, Ministère des
AND REALITY.
affaires étrangères.
Orient & Méditerranée, Laboratoire Mondes Sémitiques, UMR
8167, CNRS, Maison Suger.
One session was moderated by Juan Manuel Tebes.
Paper by Juan Manuel Tebes: “Trade before the Incense Trade:
Website: http://www.mae.u-paris10.fr/
Interconnections between the NW Hejaz and the Southern
Levant in the Late Second Millennium BCE.”
Paris, March 13, 2012.
SEMINAR: ARCHEOLOGIE ET HISTOIRE DE L’ORIENT
Website: http://www.orient-mediterranee.com/
H E L L E N I S T I Q U E E T R O M A I N . R E G I O N S N O N -
M E D I T E R R A N E E N N E S : A R A B I E , M E R R O U G E ,
Córdoba, May 21-24, 2012.
MESOPOTAMIE (PROF. F. VILLENEUVE).
IV JORNADAS NACIONALES DE HISTORIA ANTIGUA / III
Institut d’art et d’archéologie, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-
JORNADAS INTERNACIONALES DE HISTORIA ANTIGUA.
Sorbonne.
Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.
Juan Manuel Tebes presented one lecture in this seminar.
The papers presented by the CEHAO members were entitled:
Website: http://www.univ-paris1.fr/ecoles-doctorales/ed-
- Roxana Flammini: “The word heqa in the Second Stela of
archeologie/
Kamose: Context, Discourses and Classifiers.”
Birmingham, March 27-30, 2012.
- Francisco Céntola: “Divination at Emar: T itles and
CURRENT RESEARCH IN EGYPTOLOGY (CRE) XIII.
Practices.”
University of Birmingham.
- Jorge Cano Moreno: “Representation of the Minoan Elite in
Paper by Virginia Laporta: “Gender and Power Relations: A
the Neo-Palatial Period.”
Revision of the Role of Queenship during the Coregency of

Hatshepsut and Tuthmose III (c. 1476-1456 BC).”
- Virginia Laporta: “Gender and Queenship: Considering
H a t s h e p s u t a n d T h u t m o s e I I I ( c . 1 4 7 9 - 1 4 5 8 B C )
Website: http://www.crexiii.co.uk/
Corregency.”
Warsaw, April 30-May 4, 2012.
Bahía Blanca, May 28-30, 2012.
8 T H I N T E R N AT I O N A L C O N F E R E N C E O N T H E
I I J O R N A D A S I N T E R N A C I O N A L E S D E E S T U D I O S
ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST (8ICAANE).
CLÁSICOS Y MEDIEVALES: PALIMPSESTOS.
Uniwersytet Warszawski.
Universidad Nacional del Sur.
Paper by Juan Manuel Tebes: “Social Theory and the
Paper by Jorge Cano Moreno: “The function of the Minoan Elite
Archaeology of Social Complexity in Syro-Palestinian
in the Θαλασσοκατία and the Construction of the Power during
Archaeology: The Case of Iron Age Edom.”
LM IA.”
17
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER

» Scholarly Activities
CEHAO SCHOLARLY PARTICIPATION
2011/12
La Plata, June 19-22, 2012.
Rosario, August 15-16, 2012.
COLLOQUIUM: ΑΓΩΝ. COMPETENCIA Y COOPERACIÓN
V JORNADAS EXPERIENCIAS DE LA DIVERSIDAD.
DE LA ANTIGUA GRECIA A LA ACTUALIDAD.
Universidad Nacional de Rosario.
Centro de Estudios Helénicos, Universidad Nacional de La
Plata.
Paper by Francisco Céntola: “Building M1 at Emar: Evidence
and Interpretations.”
Paper by Jorge Cano Moreno: “The Minoan Thalassocracy as
Controversy.”
Rosario, August 17-18, 2012.
WORKSHOP: DIVERSIDAD DE FORMACIONES POLÍTICAS
Website: http://www.fahce.unlp.edu.ar/idihcs/ceh/
EN MESOPOTAMIA Y ZONAS CONTIGUAS.
Universidad Nacional de Rosario.
London, July 13-15, 2012.
SEMINAR FOR ARABIAN STUDIES.
Paper by Roxana Flammini: “Emerging Elites in the Nilotic-
British Museum.
Levantine World-System: Legitimation Practices of the Hyksos
Dynasty (c. 1640-1530 BC).”
Paper by Juan Manuel Tebes: “The Pottery Traditions of the Iron
Age Northwestern Hejaz and Southern Levant in the Light of
San Miguel de Tucumán, September 18-21, 2012.
Current Research.”
XXII SIMPOSIO NACIONAL DE ESTUDIOS CLÁSICOS.
Universidad Nacional de Tucumán.
Website: http://www.thebfsa.org/content/seminar-arabian-
studies/
Paper by Jorge Cano Moreno: “The Minoan θαλασσοκρατία in
Classical Sources.”
Amsterdam, July 22-26, 2012.
SOCIETY OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE INTERNATIONAL
Buenos Aires, October 30-November 1, 2012.
ANNUAL MEETING.
I JORNADAS INTERDISCIPLINARIAS DE ESTUDIOS
Universiteit van Amsterdam.
RELIGIOSOS.
Centro Cultural Francisco Paco Urondo, Facultad de Filosofía y
Paper by Juan Manuel Tebes: “Iconography, Symbolism and
Letras, Universidad de Buenos Aires.
Social World of the Qurayyah (Midianite) Pottery.”
Paper by Jorge Cano Moreno: “Did the Minoans Established a
Website: http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/International
Theocracy in the LM IA?”
meeting.aspx/
São Leopoldo, November 7-9, 2012.
Oxford, July 24-27, 2012.
E N C O N T R O S N A C I O N A I S D O G T H I S T Ó R I A D A S
CONFERENCE: THE EDOMITES (IDUMEANS) AND THE
RELIGIÕES E RELIGIOSIDADES.
NABATAEANS.
Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos.
ARAM Society for Syro-Mesopotamian Studies, Oriental
Institute of the University of Oxford.
Paper by Romina Della Casa: “Mythical Memory and Ritual
Practices in the Early Hittite Empire (c. 1450-1350 BC).”
P a p e r b y J u a n M a n u e l Te b e s : “ E d o m : T h e A r a b i a n
Connection.”
Website: http://www.unisinos.br/eventos/gthrr/
N. 8 | 2012
DAMQĀTUM - THE CEHAO NEWSLETTER
18

CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS DE HISTORIA
DEL ANTIGUO ORIENTE
LIBRARIES AND INSTITUTIONS
RELATED TO ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN STUDIES IN
BUENOS AIRES
IMHICIHU (Instituto Multidisciplinario de Historia y Ciencias
Library: Academia Argentina de Letras, Donación Dr. Abraham
Humanas / Unidad de Investigaciones sobre el Cercano Oriente
Rosenvasser
Antiguo - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y
Técnicas )
Online Library Catalog:
http://letras.edu.ar/wwwisis/inicio/form.htm/
http://imhicihu-conicet.gov.ar/
E-mail: biblioteca@aal.edu.ar
E-mail: imhicihu@conicet.gov.ar
Address: Sánchez de Bustamante 2663, Buenos Aires
Address: Saavedra 15, Buenos Aires
Tel.: (54-11) 4802-3814 / 2408 / 7509 (int. 216 / 218)
Tel.: (54-11) 4953-8548 / 2042
Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 13.15 to 18.30
CEHAO (Centro de Estudios de Historia del Antiguo Oriente)
N a t i o n a l U n i v e r s i t y o f L a P l a t a L i b r a r y ( B i b l i o t e c a d e
Humanidades )
http://www.uca.edu.ar/cehao/
http://www.bibhuma.fahce.unlp.edu.ar/
E-mail: cehao_uca@yahoo.com.ar
Address: Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1500, Buenos Aires
Online Library Catalog:
Tel: (54-11) 4349-0200 (int. 1189)
http://www.biblio.unlp.edu.ar/catalogo/opac/cgi-bin/pgopac.cgi?
form?default/
UCA Library
E-mail: bibhuma@fahce.unlp.edu.ar
Online Library Catalog:
Address: Calle 48 entre 6 y 7, 1º subsuelo, La Plata
http://www.uca.edu.ar/index.php/site/index/es/universidad/bibliot
Tel.: 423-5745
eca/catalogo-en-linea/
Fax: 423-5745
Journals:
Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 08:00 to 19:00
http://www.uca.edu.ar/index.php/site/index/es/universidad/bibliot
eca/central/hemeroteca/
ISEDET (Instituto Superior de Estudios Teológicos)
E-mail: bibliot@uca.edu.ar
Online Library Catalog:
Address: Av. Alicia Moreau de Justo 1300, Buenos Aires
http://www.isedet.edu.ar/pergamo/opac/cgi-bin/pgopac.cgi?
Tel.: (54-11) 4349-0421
form=Default/
Fax: (54-11) 4338-0695
Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 08:00 to 17:00
E-mail: biblioteca@isedet.edu.ar
Address: Camacuá 282, Buenos Aires
IHAO (Instituto de Historia Antigua Oriental “Dr. Abraham
Tel. : (54-11) 4632-5030 / 5039
Rosenvasser,” University of Buenos Aires)
Fax: (54-11) 4633-2825
http://www.filo.uba.ar/contenidos/investigacion/institutos/antorien
Seminario Rabínico “Marshal T. Meyer”
tal/biblioteca.htm/
http://www.seminariorabinico.org.ar/nuevoSite/website/contenido
E-mail: ihao@filo.uba.ar
.asp?sys=1&id=45/
Address: 25 de Mayo 217, Buenos Aires
Tel.: (54-11) 4334-7512 / 4342-5922 / 4343-1196 (int. 107)
Address: José Hernandez 1750, Buenos Aires
Fax: (54-11) 4343-2733
Tel.: (54-11) 4783-2009 / 4783-6175
Opening hours: Monday to Friday, 15:00 to 19:00
Fax: (54-11) 4781-4056
COVER ILLUSTRATION (AND P. 2): Bust of Queen Nefertiti. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Photo: Sandra Steiß.

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